Request for Comments and Announcement of FTC Workshop on Spring Privacy Series #00009

Submission Number:
00009
Commenter:
Bruce Bridwell
State:
Florida
Initiative Name:
Request for Comments and Announcement of FTC Workshop on Spring Privacy Series
Matter Number:

P145401

I think we have bigger fish to fry with mobile device privacy (NSA, HIPA compliance). However, customers should be advised of a retailers tracking policies and uses. The retailers are looking to market to its clients efficiently. I don't think it's anything nefarious in most cases. That being said, I'd be interested knowing how many retail consumers realize that they are already providing identified marketing information by using a "loyalty card" at their grocery store, drug store, etc. Signage should specify; how stores use the technology, ability to opt out (by turning Wi-Fi off for example), whether the collection of data is anonymous or not. I also believe that the sale of that data to a "Third Party" entity should be STRICTLY PROHIBITED! I'm sure there are more items to be disclosed. The signage should be very concise & easy to understand. I also think the ease of opting out should be of primary importance. I have no issue with retail tracking at most places I shop. In some I would actually prefer an ability to opt-in to enhanced marketing technologies. Yes-opt in! For example if I'm looking for a particular TV, the store would "know" that they'd have a far better chance of selling me that TV (and extra revenue from accessories associated with it). This is what my idea of enhanced data collection marketing would be. I am far more concerned with the data being collected and stored by the NSA. This is a clear violation of our 4th amendment rights. It started, I hope and believe, with good intent, but has clearly grown out of control. My other government data concerns the health records of USA citizens online availability. I have very little confidence that the information is securely stored, transmitted/received , or maintains HIPA compliance standards. I'd like to be proven wrong on that issues. All it takes is one untrained employee and one email of someone's data to prove me right.