16 CFR Part 423; Public Roundtable Analyzing Proposed Changes to the Trade Regulation Rule on Care Labeling of Textile Wearing Apparel and Certain Piece Goods as Amended #00006

Submission Number:
00006
Commenter:
Mike Sitz
Organization:
Holiday Cleaners, Inc.
State:
Colorado
Initiative Name:
16 CFR Part 423; Public Roundtable Analyzing Proposed Changes to the Trade Regulation Rule on Care Labeling of Textile Wearing Apparel and Certain Piece Goods as Amended
Matter Number:

R511915

The various solvents available today will not all do a good job without damage to all fabrics/coating/trim. I think that the symbol should allow for a specific solvent much like the circle P that is now in use. We know that the P means perc but DrySolv will also be safe in this circumstance. Perhaps an S for GreenEarth or silicone, G for glycol, W for wet clean professionally, etc... There have been a lot of problems with garments constructed of black and white panels. Used separately these fabrics are easy to deal with but when sewn together, dye transfer can be a big problem and you never know if any given garment will bleed even though the majority do. Testing of the completed garment might not be a bad idea or at least give then an option "wear until stained or smelly then dispose of properly"! The trim and to some degree, adhesives can also cause problems. Once again, some solvents will dissolve beads and such while others will not. Here is an area where the circle S, circle G or such would be a benefit. Wet cleaning is a good process but not the ultimate answer for all things. Some in government seem to thing that it is the only environmentally friendly way even though it consumes more water by far. In the arid part of the country where I live, we work hard to conserve water. Please consider this when adding wet cleaning to care labels. I use the process frequently but would not be able to go to 100% wet cleaning because of the garment mix that we get. Some of it simply requires dry cleaning in solvent to prevent improper discharge to the sewer. Including an alternate cleaning process is a good idea also. Most of the time we clean per the care label but other times we don't when we know another process is a better option. While many items can be successfully cleaned at home by hand washing, there is a big difference between wet cleaning and laundering. I think that the word "professional" should be used as in "dry clean or professional wet clean". There are many garments that need tensioning after wet cleaning and most people will not be able to do this successfully at home. Adding "professional" should indicate that tossing it in the Maytag will probably cause problems. Those who are intelligent enough will be able to research and find a process that might work if they choose to try to wet clean at home. Another thing that we run into is modified garments. Silk screen printing or hand painting on a garment with no additional tag. When processed per the original care tag the additional trim bleeds, runs, or fails. Fabric with metallic thread should just be banned. Any crease caused by wearing the garment is permanent. These are basically one time use garments and these days we simply refuse to clean them at all.