16 CFR Part 306; Automotive Fuel Ratings, Certification and Posting; Project No. R811005 #00178

Submission Number:
00178
Commenter:
Jeffrey Goelz
State:
Pennsylvania
Initiative Name:
16 CFR Part 306; Automotive Fuel Ratings, Certification and Posting; Project No. R811005
The FTC should be looking into ways to regulate gasoline distribution, specifically, allowing consumers to choose non-ethanol varieties. The EPA had admitted that ethanol changes the air/fuel ratio needed to properly combust, thus adding extra heat to components, and causing early failure of certain ones (specifically the catalytic coverter). They also have shown that ethanol can rot hoses and lines not made for ethanol use. Currently, gasoline can be found without ethanol. HOWEVER, there are many station that do not sticker their pumps (or all of their pumps) as having ethanol despite consumer complaints to townships. The use of Blender Pumps in conjunction with ethanol higher than 15% can force consumers to pump a concentrated mixture in their vehicle unwittingly because the Blender Pump dispenses from one hose, and if the last consumer selected 15%, the remainder in the hose can be pumped into the new consumer's vehicle, despite what the consumer selected. Blender Pumps, in and of themselves should be illegal for this reason alone, let alone the possibility to damage a vehicle - you are not getting what you pay for. Why not require Blender Pumps to siphon any unused gas back into the ground from the hose? Why not ban them all-together? Ethanol damages engines. The EPA freely admits this. Why is the gasoline industry allowed such freedoms?