16 CFR Part 306; Automotive Fuel Ratings, Certification and Posting; Project No. R811005 #00230

Submission Number:
00230
Commenter:
Kevin Snyder
State:
Pennsylvania
Initiative Name:
16 CFR Part 306; Automotive Fuel Ratings, Certification and Posting; Project No. R811005
So far, I figure that E10 gas has cost my wife and I about $4,000 over the past decade. Plus several hundred hours of my time over the same period since I maintain most of the referenced vehicles and equipment. We have several older vehicles and numerous small engine appliances. Our inventory includes a 1975 HDFX motorcycle, a 1964 Chevy pickup, a special construction trike powered by a 1963 Corvair engine, a 1980 IH 782 garden tractor, and a 1970 John Deere 1020 farm tractor. All of these vehicles have several things in common. First, we have owned them for a long time that predates E10 gas. Second, every one of them has experienced fuel related issues since E10 gas became common. I count seven carburetor rebuilds between them, all due to degraded components within the fuel system. The special construction trike was the worst. It has a fiberglass body with an integral fuel tank. It was built in 1984 and did not experience any fuel related problems until 2006 or so. The fiberglass body was softened by solvent action from the fuel tank. This ruined a fresh paint job and required major body surgery to cut out the fiberglass fuel tank and replace it with a custom steel tank. These repairs exceeded $3,000. Add to that the numerous carburetor rebuilds, fuel line leaks, degraded priming pumps, etc. it's not too difficult for me to add up $4,000 in repair expenses since E10 fuel came into existence. Please don't allow fuel with ethanol content over 10% to be sold. You're tearing up my machinery.