Announcement of Public Workshop, "Examining Health Care Competition" ("Health Care Workshop") Project No. P13-1207 #00055

Submission Number:
00055
Commenter:
Luis Juarez
State:
Texas
Initiative Name:
Announcement of Public Workshop, "Examining Health Care Competition" ("Health Care Workshop") Project No. P13-1207
In your support regarding eliminating barriers for professional trade for Advanced Practice Clinicians, it is imperative PAs are included. It is of paramount that the terms used for PAs such as 'assistant' and 'supervision' be viewed in the context of misnomers and outdated terminology. These terms do not represent today's scope of practice, training, nor education of PAs. PAs are trained following the identical medical model as that of physicians. That training model is focused and succint by design as the method to more efficiently present physician-level trained advanced practice clinicians into professional practice. These terms, today, reflect legal maneuvering shackles which continue to professionally bind and tether PAs to physicians. Removing these terms and rebranding the PA profession to truly represent their contribution to medicine continues to be a challenging hurdle as physician organizations cling to these terms to continually mischaracterize the contribution of PAs. I plead that the FTC carefully scrutinize PA training and education to allow for the realization that if NPs (trained in the nursing model) should be free of trade restrictions, based on the FTC's understanding of their scope of practice and training, then it should with ease arrive at the very same conclusion for PAs who are trained in the identical medical model as physicians. I beg the FTC to look beyond the immediate perceptions that the terms 'assistant' and 'supervision' evoke. I beg the FTC to look at the education and training model for PAs and realize that the those terms continue to exist only to perpetuate physician control and monopoly over the professional livelyhoods of PAs, and are the crux of the trade restrictions physician organization and licensing boards use as their weapons to influence state legislative bodies. As an example please review the American Medical Association's "Truth in Advertising Campaign" in which under the umbrella of "truth" they itemize PAs within the same category of medical assistants. This is falshood to an extreme. PAs require the contribution of outside agencies such as the FTC, that recognize untruthfullness and trade restrictions, especially when an entire profession is veiled by another profession by perpetuating falsehoods through shackles of terminology.