Speeches

Merger and Competition - The Way Ahead

The American Bar Association Annual Meeting

Toronto, Canada

Date:
By: 
Robert Pitofsky, Former Chairman

* The views expressed are those of Chairman Pitofsky, and do not necessarily reflect those of the Commission or other Commissioners.

I am delighted to have an opportunity to discuss international merger enforcement - across continents and across jurisdictions - since it raises some of the most important and challenging questions in the entire competition arena.

Competition and Consumer Protection Issues in the Digital Economy

Luncheon Address to Wireless Communications Association

Date:
By: 
Mozelle W. Thompson, Former Commissioner

Thank you for inviting me to speak to your conference today. I am happy to be here because it is an important and exciting time for media and entertainment; a time marked by change and promise for your industry. In fact, the recent change of your association's name from the Wireless Cable to Wireless Communications Association reflects not only the development of your industry but the new ways in which you will interact with consumers, and how agencies like the FTC will interact with you.

Pyramid Schemes

International Monetary Funds Seminar on Current Legal Issues Affecting Central Banks

Washington, D.C.

Date:
By: 
Debra A. Valentine, Former General Counsel

I would like to thank you for the opportunity to speak about the growing international problem of pyramid schemes. What is striking about these schemes is that while they are very old forms of fraud, modern technology has vastly multiplied their potential for harming our citizens. The Internet in particular offers pyramid builders a multi-lane highway to world-wide recruits in virtually no time.

Report from the Bureau of Competition

The American Bar Association, Antitrust Section Spring Meeting 1998, Federal Trade Commission Committee

Washington, D.C.

Date:
By: 
William J. Baer, Former Director

Introduction

Good morning, and thanks for inviting me back for my third report from the Bureau of Competition. The last two years I have used this opportunity to report to the antitrust bar on some of the pressing issues and cases that are in the cross hairs of the Bureau. With your indulgence, I will follow a similar format this year.(1)

The Robinson-Patman Act: Annual Update

The Robinson-Patman Act Committee, Section of Antitrust Law, Forty-Sixth Annual Spring Meeting

Washington, D.C.

Date:
By: 
Donald S. Clark, Secretary of the Commission

The views expressed in this speech are those of the author, and do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Trade Commission, of any of the Commissioners, or of any other member of the Commission staff. I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today.

Advertising and Unfair Competition: FTC Enforcement

13th Annual Advanced ALI-ABA Course of Study for In-House and Outside Counsel

Date:
By: 
Sheila F. Anthony, Former Commissioner

Good Morning. I am happy to be with ALI-ABA again this year to talk about the Federal Trade Commission's ("FTC's") national advertising program.

The FTC's national advertising program is a vibrant and integral part of the Commission's mission. Over the years this meeting has served as a forum to highlight recent developments and initiatives so, I am really delighted to have this opportunity to be here today.

Vertical Issues in Federal Antitrust Law

13th Annual Advanced ALI-ABA Course of Study

Date:
By: 
Sheila F. Anthony, Former Commissioner

It is a pleasure to be here in San Francisco, even with El Nino, to participate with such a distinguished panel in this ALI-ABA program on "Product Distribution and Marketing." This afternoon I will address vertical issues in federal antitrust law. Vertical antitrust issues arise in the context of relationships -- contractual or through merger -- between businesses at different levels in the chain of distribution; for example, between the maker of military aircraft and the maker of stealth radar technology.

Self-Regulation and Antitrust

D. C. Bar Association Symposium

Washington, D.C.

Date:
By: 
Robert Pitofsky, Former Chairman

Self-regulation efforts that are serious, legitimate and fair should not be blocked by rigid and outdated interpretations of antitrust laws, Robert Pitofsky, Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, said today. In a speech before the D.C. Bar Association, Pitofsky expanded on this theme as he spoke to the increasingly common question -- are antitrust and self-regulation at odds? "My answer," the chairman said, "is that antitrust only rarely limits the opportunities for genuine self-regulation."

The Emerging Electronic Marketplace

Prepared Remarks before Cyberbanking and Electronic Conference

Washington, D.C.

Date:
By: 
Robert Pitofsky, Former Chairman

* The views expressed are those of Chairman Pitofsky, and do not necessarily reflect those of the Commission or other Commissioners.

Over one hundred years ago, Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren wrote some words that resonate in a remarkable way today:

FTC Perspectives on Competition Policy and Enforcement Initiatives in Electric Power

The Conference on The New Rules of the Game for Electric Power: Antitrust & Anticompetitive Behavior.

Washington, D.C.

Date:
By: 
William J. Baer, Former Director

Good morning. It is a pleasure to be here. I'd like to start off by thanking Andy Strenio for inviting me to participate in this program. I was happy to accept, not only because he is an old friend and a former FTC Commissioner, but because the issues that will be discussed here are tremendously important.

The Consumer Protection Pyramid: Education, Self-Regulation, and Law Enforcement

The Korea Consumer Festival '97

Seoul, Republic of Korea

Date:
By: 
Roscoe B. Starek, III, Former Commissioner

Good morning. Thank you for inviting me to participate in the 1997 Korea Consumer Festival. I am honored and delighted to be here to tell you about the United States Federal Trade Commission's efforts to protect consumers by preventing unfair, deceptive, or anticompetitive practices in the marketplace. I serve as one of five presidentially-appointed Commissioners overseeing all the activities of the FTC.(1)

The FTC and Dietary Supplements

FDLI Conference on Substantiating Claims for Dietary Supplement Advertising and Labeling, Washington Hilton and Towers Hotel

Washington, D.C.

Date:
By: 
Jodie Bernstein, Former Director

Good morning. I'd like to thank FDLI for organizing this conference today. I hope that, with the help of our staff, FDA staff and representatives of the state Attorneys General, we will reach a better understanding of the regulatory framework that governs supplement advertising and labeling, and offer some practical advice as to how to steer clear of law enforcement problems.

From Open Access to Convergence Mergers: An Antitrust Perspective on the Transition to Electricity Competition (Revised: February 6, 1998)

The Competition Symposium, Brubaker & Associates, Omni Shoreham

Washington, D.C.

Date:
By: 
Jonathan B. Baker, Former Director

INTRODUCTION

In looking over the program before you arrived this morning, some of you may well have asked: what is someone from the Federal Trade Commission doing as our luncheon speaker? I thought this was an electricity conference. After all we've got FERC and the state commissions looking over our shoulders, including looking at mergers. What have we got here, some sort of party crasher? Besides violating the obvious adage and giving an economist a free lunch, what's the point?

Vertical Restraints and Vertical Aspects of Mergers--A U.S. Perspective

Fordham Corporate Law Institute, 24th Annual Conference on International Antitrust Law and Policy

Date:
By: 
Robert Pitofsky, Former Chairman

I. Introduction.

The history of the U.S. approach to vertical nonprice antitrust issues can safely be called checkered. All three branches of our government have struggled over the years, not always consistently, to define the line between permissible and impermissible conduct in this area. These fluctuations in policy and law are not surprising since vertical issues are complicated, hold possibilities of both competitive harm and efficiencies, and lead reasonable people to differ in close cases.

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