Blog Posts Tagged with Health Care

Promoting healthy competition in health IT markets

The FTC has been a consistent proponent of competition in health care markets, utilizing our full range of study, advocacy, and enforcement tools. We are equally proud of our track record in promoting innovation and responding to new technological developments throughout our 100-year history.

Reference pricing is not a substitute for competition in health care

In recent years, the U.S. health care sector has seen numerous innovations in the way care is organized and reimbursed (e.g., accountable care organizations, bundled payments, etc.), all with the goal of reducing expenditures and improving quality. One innovation that has received a great deal of attention recently is reference pricing.

Preserving competition among hometown hospitals

In cities and towns throughout the U.S., hospitals are a key part of the health care delivery system. Every day, Americans seek care from their local hospital at significant and vulnerable times, from the birth of a baby to treatment for a serious illness. The FTC works to promote competition in health care markets, including hospital services, because vigorous competition promotes the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective health care.

The doctor (or nurse practitioner) will see you now: Competition and the regulation of advanced practice nurses

The FTC employs many experts in competition, consumer protection, and economics. We embrace our special role in helping other policymakers understand how the competitive process benefits consumers, and encouraging them to adopt rules that promote competition.

Examining health care competition: Time for another check-up

When was your last health exam? Just as we (are supposed to) get regular check-ups from our health care providers, the FTC thinks it is smart to do a periodic check-up on the health care industry itself. Health care is a critical sector of the U.S. economy, affecting the lives of all American consumers.

Competition to reduce the costs of biologic medicines

When faced with a major illness, patients usually want the best medicine available, regardless of cost. In some cases, next-generation “biologic” medicines may be the best treatments available. Unfortunately, these critical treatments can be very expensive. For example, Herceptin, used to treat breast cancer, can cost more than $50,000 a year; Remicade, which treats rheumatoid arthritis, more than $10,000 a year.