FTC Blogs

Supreme Court: Self-interested boards must be actively supervised

Yesterday, the Supreme Court affirmed the Fourth Circuit’s decision to uphold the FTC’s order against the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners In a tour-de-force opinion laying out the proper scope of the state action doctrine first articulated in Parker v.

National Consumer Protection Week in every community

When National Consumer Protection Week starts on Sunday, it will mark the 17th year of a growing partnership. NCPW now includes 89 federal, state and local agencies and non-profits working together to connect people with the best consumer education resources.At NCPW.gov, you’ll find resources to help you manage your money, handle credit and debt, stay safe online, avoid identity theft, and more. Read the latest news from consumer protection experts on our blog; share videos, articles, audio tips, and blog posts; order free resources; or file a complaint when you spot a scam. You’ll also get ideas on how to get involved so you can help us spread the word about consumer protection.

FTC and NY Attorney General team up again to tackle abusive debt collectors

On the heels of their victory against National Check Registry, the FTC and the New York Attorney General teamed up again to announce two complaints against debt collectors that allegedly used a slew of abusive and deceptive tactics to pressure consumers into making payments on questionable debts.

You (haven’t really) won!

For years, we’ve been hearing about lottery scams: the imposter who convinces you that you’ve won the lottery (you didn’t) – and all you have to do is pay some fees to collect your millions (you won’t). And for years, we’ve been hearing about lottery scams that originate in Jamaica, where telemarketing lottery scams became a cottage industry in some parts of the island.

Scientific substantiation: Take the right “app”roach

According to the National Cancer Institute, melanoma of the skin is the most deadly form of skin cancer. Many people want to keep an eye out for possible symptoms and take action fast, if necessary. So, could you make an app for that? Hmm, as “app”ealing as it sounds, hold the phone.

Can your app really do that?

Apps can provide hours of entertainment, keep you organized, and help you learn something new. Indeed, apps can be helpful, as long as they provide accurate information. But if you’re trying to analyze a serious medical condition with an app — like whether that mole on your back might be a sign of melanoma — talk with your doctor or another reliable medical professional first. As recent FTC cases show, some health apps make claims they can’t back up.

Law and Orders

Once you’re subject to an FTC order, if you do not comply with its provisions, there are consequences in addition to any you face for deceptive or misleading practices.  Violation of an order can pave the way for civil penalties.

The FTC swats company’s claims about mosquito repellent bands

Imagine you’re sitting on the patio sipping a cold, refreshing drink, or you’re watching your kid’s afternoon game. Then, without warning, those annoying, unwelcome guests swoop in and ruin the fun. Come on, now, I don’t mean your in-laws! I’m talking about those pesky mosquitoes, buzzing around and bugging everyone in sight. We’ve all been there, right?