Tag: Health Claims

Displaying 41 - 60 of 408 results.

Just as Helen of Troy has gone down in history as The Face that Launched a Thousand Ships, a seriously flawed study purporting to show that green coffee bean extract is scientifically proven to cause weight loss may be remembered as The Fake that Launched a Thousand Slips.  An FTC...
A federal district judge in Atlanta has issued an order finding that two dietary supplement marketers failed to comply with a previous court order that required them to recall purported weight-loss products that they deceptively pitched to consumers. The current order, issued on September 2,...
A Texas-based company, Applied Food Sciences, Inc. (AFS), has settled Federal Trade Commission charges that it used the results of a flawed study to make baseless weight-loss claims about its green coffee extract to retailers, who repeated those claims in marketing finished products to consumers.
Following a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved a final order settling charges that supplement marketers i-Health, Inc. and Martek Biosciences made deceptive claims while advertising their BrainStrong Adult dietary supplement.
For some athletes and fans, September is the equivalent of the start of the sports “new year.” From the FTC’s perspective, it’s a good time to remind retailers that they need appropriate proof to support concussion protection claims for athletic mouthguards. That’s why FTC staff has...
Staff of the Federal Trade Commission has sent letters to five major retailers, alerting them to concerns about whether there is adequate substantiation for concussion-protection claims made for athletic mouthguards sold on their web sites.
"A-B-C. Always be closing.""As you all know, first prize is a Cadillac El Dorado. Second prize is a set of steak knives. Third prize is you're fired.""These are the new leads. The Glengarry leads. To you, they're gold. But you don't get them. Why? Because they're for closers...
A federal district judge in Atlanta is expected to provide a ruling in the coming week in a Federal Trade Commission case against the marketers of three weight-loss and health-related dietary supplements. In May, the defendants were ordered to pay more than $40 million for violating a 2008 court...
In the movie The Matrix, Morpheus offers Neo two capsules: “You take the blue pill and the story ends. You wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill and you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.
The Quebec-based marketers of a supposed weight-loss treatment have agreed to pay  $500,000 to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that they deceived consumers with bogus claims that their Double Shot pills would cause rapid, substantial, and permanent weight loss, without diet or exercise.
A consumer survey was conducted to examine the communication effects of a promotional booklet for a dietary supplement. The booklet consisted entirely of three pages of consumer testimonials, primarily from senior citizens, touting the product's efficacy for treating various diseases...
An administrator working for the Federal Trade Commission is mailing 196,969 checks averaging $47.51 each to consumers who purchased an abdominal exercise device known as the Ab Circle Pro.
There are certain questions we ask ourselves when investigating companies’ health claims. Did they have appropriate substantiation? Did they tell the truth when they said their claims were supported by scientific studies? Did they clearly disclose that product endorsers were getting...
The settlement with TriVita, Inc. is part of the FTC’s ongoing efforts to stop over-hyped health claims.
When ads for beauty products convey subjective claims – for example, L’Oréal’s long-standing “Because I’m worth it” tagline – it’s unlikely consumers would think statements like that are supported by science.  (It’s hard to imagine a testing protocol that could establish whether or...
Cosmetics company L’Oréal USA, Inc. has agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges of deceptive advertising about its Lancôme Génifique and L’Oréal Paris Youth Code skincare products. According to the FTC’s complaint, L’Oréal made false and unsubstantiated claims that its Génifique and...

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