Tag: Advertising and Marketing

Displaying 881 - 900 of 1447 results.

Consumer complaints about robocalls have multiplied.  New technologies make it cheaper to send pre-recorded messages and con artists have gotten trickier about obscuring the origin of their calls.  But businesses shouldn’t be tempted to take telemarketing short-cuts because the FTC...
Never underestimate the creativity of marketers attempting to separate cash-strapped consumers from their last dollar.  And never underestimate the FTC’s resolve to protect people from deception in tough economic times.  Those are just two points to take from recent FTC law...
Ask any golfer.  How you address the ball matters, but don’t underestimate the importance of the follow-through.  In law enforcement, too, follow-through can be key.  A recent development in the FTC’s action involving Neil Wardle illustrates that point.
Unless you’re playing Scrabble and use QI or ZA on a triple letter square, two-letter words usually don’t count for much.  A consumer perception study released by the FTC suggests that two common two-letter words often used in ads may not have the effect of qualifying product claims...
The Federal Trade Commission today released an FTC-commissioned study indicating that when marketers use the phrase "up to" in claims about their products, many consumers are likely to believe that they will achieve the maximum "up to" results. The study describes what a test group of consumers...
The terms of the FTC’s Spokeo settlement apply just to Spokeo, but that case and other recent law enforcement actions offer insights for a much broader audience.
The lawsuit against data broker Spokeo is the FTC’s first Fair Credit Reporting Act case addressing the collection of online info — including data from social networking sites — when used in the context of employment screening.  But that’s not the only way the Spokeo settlement...
Like chicken and waffles or ham and pineapple on pizza, some combos don’t sound like they’d go together, but make sense once you find out more.  Put the FTC’s settlement with Spokeo on that list.  According to the FTC, data broker Spokeo violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act and...
A tank top and cut-offs are perfect for a balmy day in Boca Raton, just as a down parka and fuzzy mittens will ward off the shivers in Sheboygan.  That's the idea behind the Department of Energy’s new regional efficiency standards for heating and cooling equipment.  Unlike earlier...
On classic episodes of the Tonight Show, affable sidekick Ed McMahon sought guidance from Johnny Carson's all-knowing Carnac character.  But as demonstrated by a recent FTC law enforcement action — which involved a company's misleading reference to the late Mr. McMahon — you don't...
It's on now:  the FTC's national workshop In Short:  Advertising & Privacy Disclosures in a Digital World.  How can you get involved?
In Short: Advertising and Privacy Disclosures in a Digital World — an FTC workshop to discuss guidance on disclosures in the online and mobile world — is set for May 30, 2012.  This is the latest development in the ongoing conversation about revising the FTC’s 2000 guidance...
An FTC Administrative Law Judge ruled that POM Wonderful LLC and related parties made misleading claims that POM Wonderful 100% Pomegranate Juice and other products would treat, prevent, or reduce the risk of heart disease, prostate cancer, and erectile dysfunction.  Although the...
According to the FTC, Skechers made false and deceptive claims about the benefits of Shape-ups and other Skechers brands.  If you’re in the fitness or health business, the $40 million settlement should grab your attention.  But the underlying principles apply to all advertisers.  If...
It’s usually Skechers promising to help people shape up. But this time, the shoe’s on the other foot.  In a $40 million settlement announced by the FTC — part of a broader agreement that also resolves charges by state AGs — the agency is telling Skechers to shape up its claims for...
The Federal Trade Commission announced that Skechers USA, Inc. has agreed to pay $40 million to settle charges that the company deceived consumers by making unfounded claims that Shape-ups would help people lose weight, and strengthen and tone their buttocks, legs and abdominal muscles.

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